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Zero-scape Installation at the Contemporary Arts Collective
The Arts Factory, Las Vegas, Nevada, June 2005

The installation “zero-scape”, comprised of dozens of untreated masonite forms, is a combination of the cheap (material) and the beautiful (form) that references the illusion - or façade - created by so many shopping malls, subdivisions, and mcmansions.

The media - masonite (with bar codes still intact) and Stryofoam - are mass produced, cheap, and commercial. The masonite forms themselves, derived using a deliberate methodology of simple variations resulting from moving from square to circle, reference both nature and architecture through the shared language of subtle variation. When stacked, layered, placed in proximity to one another, they generate a constructed landscape, referencing both manmade and natural, with the potential for limitless manifestations.

Like the landscaping commonly found in contemporary subdivisions (those modular units imposed on a defenseless environment), the piece suggests constructed nature- not that which is truly natural, but which embodies the qualities that consumer society has taught us mean natural. The installation exists as a façade that both conceals and reveals, just like this tendency in our culture, and as such acknowledges the loss of our connection with the natural world.

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